Starting Herceptin, Zolodex and radiotherapy treatment

I can’t quite believe we’re nearly half way through December already. Here we are with just under two weeks to go until Christmas and I’ve now started the next stage of my treatment. Last Tuesday morning I had the first of my Herceptin (Trastuzumab) injections which will continue for the next year. 

As it was being administered into my thigh, I squeezed hold of Pats’ hand and whilst it did sting a little, luckily it wasn’t too painful. It was quite unlike any injection I’ve had before as it took the nurse a good few minutes to inject it. I wasn’t looking, but Pats told me the nurse was gently and slowly injecting the fluid into my leg. We then had to wait for two hours afterwards to ensure that I didn’t suffer any adverse side effects (which I didn’t).

After applying a local anaesthetic cream onto my tummy, just to the left of my belly button, I was given the second treat of the day. This was an early Christmas present from my oncologist – the Zolodex injection. I’d recently heard from other ladies that this can be a really painful injection (hence the numbing cream) so I was really quite nervous about it. The nurse suggested that I didn’t look at the needle, just as well as Pats said it was rather large! It actually implants a small pellet into the skin area. My eyes diverted to every possible location in the room other than the needle going in. To my surprise it wasn’t as painful as I anticipated!

I’d  discussed hormone treatment with my oncologist the day before and he was still undecided whether to prescribe me Tamoxifen or to use an alternative aromatise inhibitor in conjunction with Zolodex. ‘Let’s switch your ovaries off for Christmas and start the hormone treatment in the New Year,’ he said. And a merry Christmas to you too!

Goserelin, or Zolodex as it is also known, is a hormonal therapy used to treat breast cancer. It works by interfering with the way hormones are made or how they work in the body. The breast cancer I had was strongly oestrogen receptor-positive (ER positive) and therefore relies on this hormone to grow. Zolodex is used to treat women who have ER positive breast cancer who have not yet gone through the menopause. It can be used after surgery to reduce the chance of the cancer coming back (typically over a two-year period). Before menopause, almost all oestrogen is made by the ovaries – Zolodex stops the ovaries from making oestrogen.

I am slightly concerned about what effect this is going to have on me. Because the Zolodex will prevent my body from producing oestrogen it will technically put me into a medically induced menopause. Woo hoo, another lovely side effect to add to the list and cope with. Having said that I am glad that my body won’t be producing the hormone which will reduce the risk of the cancer coming back. But what will this do to me? Will I grow a beard?! Will I become moody? I do hope for my hubby’s sake that neither of these are the case.

After a quick lunch break we returned for the third and triple whammy appointment of the day, my first radiotherapy treatment. There was a delay with the machine so we had a bit of a wait. After an initial meeting to discuss the treatment, side effects and do’s and don’ts, I was given a rather lovely gown to change into that I will keep for the duration of my treatment. We then sat in a smaller sub waiting room until I was called in.

clinacI walked into the room and was greeted by two nurses and could see a very large ‘Clinac’ machine. As I laid out on the bed, the nurses drew on me, lined me up with the machinery and were calling out various numbers around me. There was music playing along in the background. Although whilst this initial part was happening, a particularly dramatic and apocalyptic piece was playing which made it all feel rather intense. Luckily the nurse asked to skip on the song as it was supposed to be festive Christmas music!

I lay there looking up at the ceiling above me which was emblazoned with an image of bright blue sky and the branches of a tree sprinkled with white spring blossom, whilst Christmas songs were playing over the speaker – a very strange and surreal experience indeed.

The team explained what would happen and that they would leave the room whilst the treatment was in progress, but that I would be monitored on a camera at all times. If I needed to alert them at all I just needed to raise my arm. I laid there very still, thinking back to what the nurse had said earlier about trying to relax and to breathe as normally as possible. Quite difficult when you’re laying in a position trying not to make any movements at all!

As I write this now I have completed five radiotherapy treatments so far. I’m pleased to say that it’s not painful at all, but I am very aware of a feeling or sensation of something ‘happening’ in that area. I can’t really explain it, more like a tightness, or almost going back to a period post surgery where I was very aware of that area/my scar. I have definitely started to feel more tired, but they did say this was to be expected, especially following chemotherapy treatment.

I received some recommendations of products to use on the skin from other ladies who have had radiotherapy, so I have an arsenal of creams and gels at my disposal.

Have you had any of these treatments described in this post? Have you suffered any side effects? If so, do you have any tips you can share to help  deal with these?

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9 thoughts on “Starting Herceptin, Zolodex and radiotherapy treatment

  1. I’m hoping (for you and for me!) that a beard is not forthcoming Allie! Really enjoyed reading this post and tracking through your treatments. Steve has some tips for Pats regarding an early menopause coping strategy (for partners…….).

    I think that that very same cherry blossom panel was present at the Churchill Hospital too- I remember it vividly 🙂

    Take care as always,
    Rosemary
    x

    Liked by 1 person

      1. As I said in my post Allie had mastectomy chemo radiotherapy and Herceptin it seems your never getting to the end of treatments but it will happen.When I finished all treatment felt a bit lost as if your on your own now imagine missing the hospital 😉😉 Take care Allie xx

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      2. Thanks Linda. It’s good to be able to see the finish line in front of me (except the ongoing injections!) I’m looking forward to getting back to a bit of ‘normality’ in the new year. I can imagine it’s a bit of struggle when leaving the safety of the hospital environment. I’ve signed up to a ‘Moving Forward’ course and some counselling which I hope will help me transition from being in treatment back into the big wide world again. All the best xx

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  2. Hi there, following your blog from SIngapore. I’m on taxol + Herceptin, on a 12 week cycle, once a week. I opted for a double mastectomy (family history) and my oncologist said that I may not need tamoxifen because I don’t have any, well, breasts. I’ll Cross that bridge when I come to it. You seem very strong, and Gosh it’s a journey isn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey there, thanks so much for following. It is isn’t it? :-/ Are you taking any other anti-hormone treatment if you’re not taking tamoxifen? My Onco is still considering whether to put me on tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor in conjunction with the zolodex. Best wishes to you xx

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      1. My oncologist yesterday now said that I will be on tamoxifen in the end… I’m 43, which means I’ve got a few years before I’m menopausal! Great. It’s all the Long terms side effects that have me worried.

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